Notes from Our May 2024 HOPE Meeting

If you missed our May 2024 HOPE hearing loss online support meeting, here are the notes. This meeting featured a guest speaker, Deb Morrison, who shared her experiences with her hearing dog.

Notes from HOPE meetings are always available on our blog shortly after the meeting. You can read more about our HOPE program here.

Guest Speaker: Deb Morrison and Her Service Dog, Mango

Deb started losing her hearing in college, and shortly after she had her first child, she was diagnosed with Meniere’s Disease in both ears. She lost her hearing rapidly, the surgery to restore it failed, and her balance nerve was destroyed.

This loss was difficult, but also a blessing in disguise. Deb applied for a hearing dog through Canine Companions in 2017, and was matched with her dog, Mango in 2019. Mango helped Deb find her purpose: helping people with hearing loss as an advocate.

How Mango the Hearing Dog Helps Deb

At 5:00 am, Mango’s internal clock wakes up, so she wakes Deb up.

Deb trained Mango to alert on sounds Deb needs to hear, like alarms or water running. If a tornado siren goes off, Mango will alert and take Deb to the basement for safety. When Deb and Mango are driving, and Mango hears a siren, she’ll alert Deb with a nose bump. When Deb accidentally left the refrigerator door open and it beeped repeatedly, Mango heard the beep and took Deb to the refrigerator. At a doctor’s appointment, Mango will let Deb know when her name is called. If her husband needs Deb for something, Mango will take Deb to him.

Mango goes wherever Deb goes, including on planes, boats, cars, trains, and subways. Mango even kayaks and hikes with Deb! Together, they did a 5K race. Mango is kind of a local star: She’s been on the news. People love to take photos of her.

If Deb drops something, like her car keys or glasses, Mango will retrieve them for her. She can even help Deb find something as small as a hearing aid.

Deb believes that Mango keeps her safe and gave Deb back her independence. Before Mango, Deb didn’t like to drive or travel on her own, and she withdrew from everything when she lost her hearing. Mango is so friendly that she brings people into Deb’s circle once again.

Canine Companions Notes

Canine Companions has their own breeding program. They train only goldens, labs, or lab-golden mixes.

The cost to train a hearing dog is $50,000. Some organizations will charge for a hearing dog, or ask you to fundraise several thousand dollars toward the cost. But Canine Companions’ dogs are provided to recipients at no charge.

Hearing dogs like Mango are bred to be smaller, since they’re not doing active work like pulling wheelchairs or opening doors. Many hearing dogs do just fine without a yard or in an apartment. Deb noted that Canine Companions matches you carefully with a dog that fits your personality and lifestyle.

Our Latest News, May 14, 2024

A BIG thank you, a local hearing loss story, webinars on OTC hearing, aids, and more hearing loss support and news from Washington State.

Washington State Hearing Loss News

Our Warmest, Biggest Thank You to Our Community, Friends, and Allies for Giving BIG

Because of your generosity, not only did we reach our GiveBIG goal, we exceeded it! You gave almost $8,000 this year, a record-breaking amount. Wow!

You inspire us with your support. Together with you, we help people with hearing loss find hope, encouragement, and the resources they need to thrive. Thank you!

purple background and the words thank you three times

Don’t Forget Our Annual Picnic

We’re returning once again to Lake Boren Park for our picnic on July 20, 2024, in Newcastle, Washington. Everyone is welcome. A hearing loop and PA system are provided.

Stay tuned for more details, including our program, lunch, and special guests.

color photo of park with trees, green grass, and path. sign reads lake boren park.


Learn About Our State’s Dementia Action Plan

Hearing loss is linked to dementia and cognitive decline. For years, HLAA-WA has been part of the Washington State Dementia Action Collaborative to ensure that hearing loss, hearing aids, and hearing care are part of the State’s Dementia Action Plan.

Find out more about the plan and learn what Washington State is doing to care for people with dementia at a webinar on June 4, 2024, at 10:00 – 11:30 am. Be sure to turn on the captions, or ask for them if needed. Free.

color photo of a young woman and an older woman looking at paperwork. text reads Dementia Action Collaborative Washington State


The Things We Do When We Have a Hearing Loss

In the first of our new blog series on personal stories of hearing loss and hope, Rick Faunt shares his hearing loss journey, from OUCH to OOPS to BAHA.

color photo of close-up of man holding his ear


Hearing-Friendly Events Coming Up at MOHAI

Seattle’s Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI) has two events coming up with ASL interpretation and CART captioning.

If you attend these events and enjoy them, please let us know: webmaster@hearingloss-wa.org.

logo reads mohai, museum of history and industry. letter oh is a compass

National Hearing Loss News

May Is Better Hearing Month
Protect, Check, and Treat

During Better Hearing Month, why not share some hearing loss advice with your friends and family?

  • Turn down your volume and wear good-fitting earplugs.
  • Then, check your hearing regularly.
  • The average wait to treat hearing loss is seven years. That’s too long! Treat your hearing loss quickly to help preserve your physical and mental health.

Read more about Better Hearing Month on HLAA’s website.

color graphic. text reads hearing loss is a growing public health crisis, make sure you protect your ears, check hearing regularly, and treat hearing loss quickly

Register by May 26 for Early Bird Discounts for the HLAA Convention

The early-bird discount for the HLAA convention ends on May 26, 2024, so don’t wait!

The convention this summer will include the inspirational keynote speaker Shanna Adamic (photo, right), a research symposium on the emotional side of hearing loss, product demonstrations, and workshops on topics like state-level advocacy, role playing for communication strategies –both workshops from our local advocates! — and more.

Over-the-Counter Hearing Aids:
Ask The Experts Webinar

Questions about over-the-counter hearing aids? You can ask the OTC manufacturers themselves at two upcoming webinars from HLAA. All HLAA webinars are free, live-captioned, and open to everyone.

  • May 22, 2024, 11:00 – Noon Pacific time: Meet the Manufacturers, Part 1: Essilor Luxottica and Sony
  • June 5, 2024, 11:00 – Noon Pacific time: Meet the Manufacturers, Part 2: Sonova and Jabra.
color graphic with photo of hearing aids. plus text reads oh-tee-see 101, ask the experts webinar series, 2 new webinars, meet the manufacturers of over-the-counter hearing aids, ask the people behind the products, webinar 3 and 4, may 22 and june 5, 2024, 2-3 pm ET, learn more and register at hearingloss.org/otc101

Webinar: The Case for Employees with Hearing Loss

People with disabilities such as hearing loss remain underemployed even today. In this free, captioned webinar on May 21, 2024, Professor David Baldridge will discuss the latest employment data, his current research, and practical implications for people with hearing loss and their employers, supervisors, coworkers, and allies. Dr. Baldridge is also an HLAA board member and cochlear implant user.

Resilience Can Help You Navigate Your Hearing Loss

Setbacks and frustrations are often part of our hearing loss journeys. Resilience strategies, like flexibility and humor, can help us deal with our hearing loss in better ways.

For excellent tips, check out this terrific article from our friends at Hearing Loss Live.

color photo of woman walking in the rain with a yellow umbrella. she's surrounded by green grass, trees, and bluebells.

Enjoy New Music Even with a Hearing Loss

Music means a lot to almost everyone. When you have a hearing loss, though, finding and enjoying new music can be hard.

Shari Eberts shares how she gets the most out of emerging and new-to-her music.

color photo of young woman shot from above. she's wearing headphones and smiling, lying in a field of daisies

Hearing Loops & Telecoils Spotlight

Oregon Public Broadcasting Features
Lane County Loopers

There are sixty — sixty! — loops in the city of Eugene, Oregon. How did this happen?

Oregon Public Broadcasting reports on the hard work of key loop advocates in Lane County.

two women in masks are talking on either side of an info window. a portable hearing loop is on the counter

Hearing Loss In-Person Support

Renton Hearing Loss Support Group
Friday, June 14, 2024

Our Renton support group meets the second Friday of each month (except July and August) at 1 pm at the Renton Senior Activity Center, 211 Burnett Avenue North, Renton. No need to register; simply check in at the front desk.

This group is led by our award-winning HLAA-WA Secretary Glenda Philio. A hearing loop is available, and everyone is welcome. Always free.

white text on purple background reads hearing loss help, renton support group, june 14, 2024, renton senior activity center

HLAA-Whatcom County Meeting
Saturday, June 15, 2024

The award-winning HLAA-Whatcom County Chapter meets the third Saturday of every month at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church, 2600 Lakeway Drive, Bellingham, Washington. Social time starts at 9:30 am and the meeting runs from 10:00 – 11:30 am. Live CART and a hearing loop provided. Everyone is welcome.

white text on purple background reads hearing loss help, whatcom county, june 15, 2024, 9:30, christ the servant lutheran church, bellingham

For more information on in-person hearing loss support, visit our website.


Stay Involved with HLAA and HLAA-WA

We’re glad you’re part of our community.

What more can you do to support people with hearing loss?

black and white map of washington state with photos of people

HLAA-WA does not endorse any technology, nor does exclusion suggest disapproval. We support the full spectrum of hearing technologies for everyone. As an all-volunteer run organization, 100% of every dollar donated is directed to our programs. HLAA-WA is an IRS non-profit 501(c)(3) organization; all donations are tax-deductible as allowed by relevant IRS code.


Related Posts

The Things We Do When We Have a Hearing Loss
Part Two

By Rick Faunt, HLAA-WA Treasurer

photo of headphones, ear probe, and an audiology exam report

I left off in Part 1 of my story with the hope that a half-dozen surgical attempts to correct a hearing loss would result in stabilized hearing. You may remember that my hearing loss was caused by a nonfunctioning Eustachian tube that allowed a bumper crop of germs, bugs, and other slimy things to grow and feed upon the middle ear bones. Unfortunately, my usual luck continued to hold true after these surgeries.

Success…Kind of

Yes, the surgeries did work. I got a 20 dB improvement in the hearing on my right side that lasted almost a year. But — and there’s always a “but,” isn’t there? — the “permanent” ventilation tube that was supposed to allow the ear to drain and keep the pressure equal got plugged, and it needed some TLC from the doctor.

I didn’t really notice the decrease in hearing until I had my annual follow-up hearing test and exam by the staff at the Veterans Affairs Regional Medical Center. The audiologist noticed that my hearing level had dropped since the post-surgery test, and I had effectively lost about half of the gain we had made. He also noted that the eardrum had a poor response to the pressure test.

After giving me that batch of good news, he sent me out to the waiting room to think about things until the ENT doctor could see me. The luck of the draw gave me the resident doctor this time instead of the head doctor. Oh goody, more practice for a resident! I am convinced that my chart is stamped with big letters saying, “This guy is a great guinea pig.”

Sharp, Pointed Objects….Ooops

The resident doctor looked in my ear and determined that the tube was plugged up. He tried to unstop it using a variety of sharp, pointed objects. When these didn’t work, he tried the suction hose. That worked, I guess. It sucked out the tube along with whatever was clogging it.

Upon hearing him say “Oops!” I became decidedly unfriendly. After exchanging thoughts and plans of action, we decided to let the ear heal, and I’d come back in a few months to see if any fluid had built up. He decided this after I explained in my calm, quiet, reasonable manner that the reason the tube was in my ear in the first place is because I have a long history of fluid building up and causing problems.

I waited the three months it takes for things to heal, or maybe they felt it takes that long for me to calm down. When I returned, this time I got the man, the head honcho himself, the guy that did the surgery. He looked in my ear and concluded that I needed a tube inserted to drain the fluid that had built up. Maybe the look of absolute disgust on my face had something to do with it, or maybe he suddenly recalled some of my discussions with his staff. Either way, he then apologized and said that getting a new tube inserted would probably become a routine part of my hearing care plan.

So, the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Stay tuned for part three.

About the author

Rick Faunt has been a member of HLAA, in its several names, since 1996. He has held nearly every office at the Chapter and State level and continues to this day. He is a retired Boeing worker and was a consultant/installer of various Assistive Listening Systems for the hard of hearing.

The Things We Do When We Have a Hearing Loss

By Rick Faunt, HLAA-WA Treasurer

I have different hearing losses and causes on both sides. On the left is Meniere’s Syndrome, and on the right, a combination of problems culminating in the loss of the bones in the middle ear. It is my right side that this blog post will cover.

I have never had an earache without a sore throat or vice versa, and it took me until I was 37 years old to figure this out. Some people are slow learners. When I developed a sore throat that turned my right ear into a throbbing drum of pain, I figured it was time to let a professional look at it instead of relying upon the old home remedy of wrapping my ear in Saran wrap and gutting it out.

Since I was retired from the U.S. Navy and am being “followed” by the Veterans Administration for hearing loss and related complications, I called the VA to make an appointment. After being on hold for what seemed to be a week but was only about 20 minutes, the other shoe dropped.

“Yes sir, we would love to see you, but our next opening is not for 3 months. Can you wait?”

Since I am a calm, collected, patient, and understanding individual, of course I said… If you have ever heard the phrase “he cusses like a sailor,” then you have some idea how that part of the conversation went. The gist was something like, “Lady, in three months it will have killed me or cured itself, so I won’t need your services,” accompanied by my placing the phone handset back into the cradle at about Mach 30.

So off to a civilian clinic I went instead, only to find out that I needed to see a “specialist.” I hate it when I hear this, as it always seems to mean more pain and more money.

Finally: A Specialist and a Diagnosis

After waiting only two days, I got to see the specialist. This was more like it. The doctor came in, investigated my ear, and said, “Did you know you have a nasty infection?” For this I needed a specialist? Anyhow, he got his doctor tools, put on a full-face shield, and said he’d drain the middle ear and insert a tube. Just as he finished saying this, the face shield was covered with gross yellow and green and red stuff. But I felt 1000% better already.

Now it was his turn to drop the other shoe. All those ear infections, earaches, and whatnot had been caused by a non-functioning Eustachian tube, resulting in a retraction pocket, which in turn resulted in cholesteatoma. If the Eustachian tube doesn’t work properly, the middle ear cannot equalize air pressure or drain, and nasty things start growing. When the tube is working right, you can tell by the “popping” that occurs when you drive over a mountain pass. In my case, that didn’t happen often, and some of my problems when I was SCUBA diving were now also explained.

But about that other shoe. It seems that modern medical miracles include the ability to surgically repair the middle ear, and the doctor felt that I was a good candidate for the procedure–or did he say guinea pig? After thinking about it for a couple of days, I said, “What the heck, doc. Give it a shot.”

The Surgery, Part One

After the surgery, I remember being in more pain than I had ever suffered in my total life. When Michael Ann, my girlfriend, came to pick me up, I lifted one of the patches they had placed over my eyes, looked her in the eye and said, “Go home, get the gun, shoot me.”

I couldn’t figure out why my entire body hurt when all they worked on was one ear! I mean I HURT everywhere, from the hair on my head to the hairs on my toes. After I recovered somewhat and went to the follow-up visit, the doctor explained that after about six months, I had to come back and let him finish the job. This was only part one of a two-part experience. Lucky me. The first trip was primarily to clean up the cholesteatoma and determine the extent of the damage. The bad news: The middle ear bones were all so rotted that they couldn’t be saved. The good news: Modern medical science saves the day by providing a plastic or exotic metal substitute for the middle ear bones.

The Surgery, Part Two

Six months go by, and again I make all the usual arrangements. This time when the anesthesiologist comes in and asks, “Are you allergic to any medications?” I have an informed response: “Most definitely I am, and I hope my chart shows the drugs that were used the last time. I promise you that if I wake up in as much pain this time and I recover I will bring my cement filled rubber hose back here, find you and beat you with it.”

It took him several seconds to respond to that while he was flipping through the chart so fast the pages felt like a fan. The look of combined relief and disbelief on his face made me wonder what was next. It seems that last time, they used curare, the same stuff South American Indians used on their poison arrows, as a paralyzing agent. Normally when used in small amounts, this stuff works just fine; however, lucky me is that “one in a million” who has a bad reaction. When the curare took hold, my entire body underwent a muscle spasm, and every muscle tied itself into a knot and stayed tied for the entire time I was under anesthesia. After telling me all this, he said we had a deal: We wouldn’t inflict pain on each other.

He was true to his word; I didn’t hurt as bad this time. Only my head hurt especially where they stapled my ear back on. Yes, I said stapled. I looked like one of Doctor Frankenstein’s lab rejects. I smelled like one too, since you can’t take a decent shower for a few days. After the staples–or if you are lucky, sutures–come out, you can get your head wet, but not your ear, so you take a shower holding a plastic cup over one ear. This isn’t so bad after all, as it lowers the volume of the singing.

But There’s a Problem

This procedure was supposed to restore my hearing to a good portion of “normal,” and my luck held true to form. The darn thing would not stay in place. My hearing would improve drastically for a short while, then would go away, much like a stereo with a bad solder joint in the volume circuit. Loud, soft, loud, soft. . . and then it stayed soft. Nothing was gained except an infection was cleaned up.

Being a glutton for punishment (I told you I am a slow learner), I let the doctors try to “correct” the positioning of the prosthesis a few more times. Each time it was the same thing – the bad solder joint. I finally gave up hope of fixing my hearing in that ear. I find having hearing aids a blessing in that I can always shut off my hearing when I don’t want to put up with my surroundings.

My resistance lasted about three years before the doctors talked me into trying again. During my annual checkup and evaluation, the doctors noticed that the retraction pocket was forming again, and since they couldn’t see it all, there was a probability that another cholesteatoma was growing.

Another Surgery and a Harvest

The doctor told me it would be different this time. My main goal in this attempt was a permanent ventilation tube placed and a new ear drum built and installed, as per his recommendations. I told him he could take the prosthesis out and throw it into the trash. He wasn’t willing to give up on it yet and wanted to try his idea. Since he had to open the area again anyway, I agreed to let him try. I thought that if the hearing was fixed, so much the better, but I wouldn’t get my hopes up again.

The doctor went in behind my ear and harvested (I love that term; it makes me feel like I’m a crop of some kind) some cartilage. Then he molded it into a replacement eardrum and inserted the tube. Then he took some more cartilage, built a “ramp,” and rested the prosthesis on it. This was supposed to hold things in place while they heal.

After this surgery, the “bad solder joint” didn’t go through the usual swings of loud and clear to soft and muffled. A good sign at last?

Stay tuned for part two.

About the author

Rick Faunt has been a member of HLAA, in its several names, since 1996. He has held nearly every office at the Chapter and State level and continues to this day. He is a retired Boeing worker and was a consultant/installer of various Assistive Listening Systems for the hard of hearing.

Our Latest News, April 23, 2024

Our annual picnic, hearing access in healthcare, and more hearing loss support and news from Washington State.

Washington State Hearing Loss News

Our Picnic Is On — Save the Date!

Mark your calendar for our annual picnic, July 20, 2024, at Lake Boren Park in Newcastle, Washington. Everyone is welcome. A hearing loop and PA system are provided.

Stay tuned for more details, including our program, lunch, and special guests.

text and illustration graphic. graphic is a white outline of a picnic basket. text reads annual picnic, hlaa-wa, everyone is welcome, join us for a hearing-friendly summer picnic, July 20, 2024, Lake Boren Park, Newcastle, WA


Yes, It’s Possible to Get Hearing Access in Healthcare

Hearing access in healthcare settings can be uncertain and stressful. Our president Cheri Perazzoli shares how she recently secured access for several medical tests here in the Seattle area, and she offers tips on how you can hear better at your next hospital or doctor visit.

photo of a hand stacking blocks with medical symbols on them. the blue ear symbol for hearing access is on the left.

Next HOPE Meeting: May 1, 2024
Guest Speaker: Cynthia Moynihan
“Life with a Hearing Dog”

Our May meeting features an opportunity to learn about hearing dogs from our special guest speaker, Cynthia Moynihan. Cynthia is also a Gallaudet-trained peer mentor for people with hearing loss.

Facilitated by a caring, compassionate HOPE Crew, these monthly virtual meetings are free, live-captioned, and open to everyone with hearing loss and to their friends and family. You’re welcome to ask questions, and also to simply relax, listen, and spend time with people who understand what it’s like to live with hearing loss.

We meet the first Wednesday of each month at 4:00 pm. We hope you can join us! Register for the May HOPE meeting here.

text only reads hope, virtual support group for living well with hearing loss, hope is hearing other people's experiences

GiveBIG Launches TODAY, April 23, 2024

GiveBIG, Washington’s statewide celebration of giving, kicks off today with opportunities for early giving.

Hearing loss may be invisible, but it’s everywhere. Every fifth American has some level of hearing loss, and they risk becoming isolated. Health problems can follow hearing loss too, including cognitive decline and falls.

You can help by giving to HLAA-WA. Your generosity means we can bring more help, hope, and resources for the million-plus Washingtonians with a hearing loss.

We’re stronger together. Thank you for your support!

white text on blue background reads give big powered by 501 commons may 7th through the 8th


Legislative Update: ASL Workgroup Established

Good news for people who are Deaf: A sign language workgroup is in Governor Inslee’s 2024 supplemental budget. This workgroup, led by ODHH, aims to address the shortage of ASL interpreters in our state.

At HLAA-WA, we supported this legislation, as did many of you! Thank you for your advocacy.

preschool aged boy in green t-shirt, shorts, and glasses sits on stairs. he is showing the I Love You sign in american sign language


Participants Wanted for Air Travel Access Study

Are you interested in participating in paid research activities designed to improve accessibility in air travel? Research activities could include in-home interviews, fly-alongs, flight experience documentation, online and in-person workshops, and mockup reviews.

You need to be 18 years or older and identify as at least one of these categories: Blind/low vision, Deaf/hard-of-hearing, reduced mobility, or neuro divergent. Click here to fill out the initial survey from Teague.

bright orange suitcase on light background. a small toy plane, notebook, camera and passport are scattered about.

National Hearing Loss News

Exploring Self-Employment for People with Hearing Loss Webinar, April 30, 2024

Thinking that self-employment might be a good option for you? This free, captioned HLAA webinar can help you decide.

Three panelists — Eyra Abraham, Dr. Anne McIntosh, and Shari Eberts — will share how they made self-employment work for them, and they’ll discuss the pros and cons of leaving office jobs behind.

graphic with color photo of woman in button down blouse. text reads hearing loss at work webinar series, exploring self-employent for people with hearing loss, tuesday april 30, 5pm eastern time, register at hearingloss.org/work

Hearing Health Care Program Reaches Lower-Income Arizonans

Many people, both in Arizona and across the United States, don’t have coverage for hearing care and hearing aids. This program, led by Michele Michaels, helps close the gaps so that people in lower incomes can get the care they need.

color photo of woman with white hair and glasses. she's wearing a jean jacket and holding a hearing aid

Local Leaders Win, Present at the HLAA National Convention

You’ve got even more reasons to attend the national HLAA convention in Phoenix this year: Several HLAA-WA members are presenters and award-winners.

Kimberly Parker (Spirit of HLAA Award), Cynthia Stewart, Jill Bujnevicie, and Hugo Esterhay (Excellence in State Advocacy Awards) will be honored at the awards ceremony this summer! Cynthia and Kimberly are also presenting workshops.

Register before May 26, 2024, for the convention, which runs June 26 through June 29, 2024, at the Sheraton Grand Resort at Wild Horse Pass in Phoenix, Arizona.

photo of grade school aged boy with suit jacket and button down shirt in front of a microphone

Hearing Loops & Telecoils Spotlight

What Do Hearing Loops Sound Like?

Hearing loops are the most-preferred assistive listening system. One reason is the incredible clarity of sound. With a switch of a hearing aid, CI, or BAHA to “Telecoil” mode, the sound can feel like it’s coming from inside your head — in a good way.

Listen to the difference between non-looped audio and looped audio in these videos.

wide shot of a theater from the balcony

Hearing Loss In-Person Support

Lacey-Area Hearing Loss Support Group
Wednesday, May 1, 2024

Stop by the next hearing loss group meeting on May 1 from 2:30 – 3:30 pm in the Quinault Auditorium at Panorama Senior Living. May’s meeting is a hybrid meeting; please contact Carolyn Odio for the Zoom registration (carolyn@odio.com).

Carolyn also sends a regular newsletter and has a small lending library; please contact her to receive the newsletter or find out more.

white text on purple background reads hearing loss help, lacey support group, may 1, 2024, 2:30 - 3:30 pm, Quinault Auditorium, Panorama Senior Living. photo of smiling woman in glasses in the corner

Renton Hearing Loss Support Group
Friday, May 10, 2024

Our Renton support group meets the second Friday of each month (except July and August) at 1 pm at the Renton Senior Activity Center, 211 Burnett Avenue North, Renton. No need to register; simply check in at the front desk.

This group is led by our award-winning HLAA-WA Secretary Glenda Philio. A hearing loop is available, and everyone is welcome. Always free.

purple graphic with white writing that reads hearing loss help, renton support group, may 10, 2024, 1 pm, renton senior activity center. photo of woman smiling in corner

HLAA-Whatcom County Meeting
“Getting to Know You,” May 18, 2024

The award-winning HLAA-Whatcom County Chapter meets the third Saturday of every month at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church, 2600 Lakeway Drive, Bellingham, Washington. Social time starts at 9:30 am and the meeting runs from 10:00 – 11:30 am. Live CART and a hearing loop provided. Everyone is welcome.

graphic with photo of woman holding crystal award, text reads hearing loss help whatcom county may 18 ,2024, 10 am to 11:30 am, christ the servant lutheran church, bellingham

For more information on in-person hearing loss support, visit our website.


Stay Involved with HLAA and HLAA-WA

We’re glad you’re part of our community.

What more can you do to support people with hearing loss here and across the country?

black and white map of washington state with photos of people

HLAA-WA does not endorse any technology, nor does exclusion suggest disapproval. We support the full spectrum of hearing technologies for everyone. As an all-volunteer run organization, 100% of every dollar donated is directed to our programs. HLAA-WA is an IRS non-profit 501(c)(3) organization; all donations are tax-deductible as allowed by relevant IRS code.


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