We’re Talking Loops and Telecoils with Audiologists at the 2023 AAA Conference in Seattle

Hearing loops in venues and telecoils in hearing aids: Today, this combination is still the gold standard for hearing accessibility the world over. In fact, hearing loops are so beloved that they inspired local and even national movements like HLAA’s Get in the Hearing Loop and even Loop Washington, which was founded by our HLAA-WA President Cheri Perazzoli.

You’ll hear a lot about new Bluetooth technologies like Auracast, and while these technologies are promising, they’re not yet ready for prime time. Auracast will co-exist with hearing loops and telecoils for years. That means we need audiologists to help us use all the technologies available to us — including telecoils — for the foreseeable future.

Audiologists juggle a lot of priorities during a patient’s visit, and it can be easy to forget to talk to patients about telecoils in their hearing aids. Armed with the knowledge of telecoils and the know-how to use them in public spaces, however, patients can truly make the most of their hearing devices. Which means they can live, work, play, and travel more safely and confidently.

We often say, “People with hearing loss want to hear wherever they go.” Ann Thomas from HLAA-Diablo Valley adds, “People with hearing loss live uncertain lives.” Hearing loops, telecoils, and Bluetooth reduce that uncertainty and empower people with hearing loss to communicate in more places.

That was our message as we connected with audiologists at the American Academy of Audiology conference (HearTECH Expo) April 19-22, 2023, at the Convention Center in Seattle.

A huge THANK YOU to the American Academy of Audiology and the terrific audiologists who welcomed us to their conference and provided a complimentary booth for us in the accessibility pavilion.

Rise and Shine: Travel Alarms Designed for People Who Are Hard of Hearing or Deaf

By Cheri Perazzoli

black and white photo of an alarm clock and a small auxiliary device

Recently, when I stayed with my daughter for a few days, I used my iPhone as a type of travel alarm clock. Unless I placed my phone very close, I slept right through through the alarm–even with the vibrate and flash alert modes turned on. I was vigilant about keeping my phone just “so,” but then I couldn’t relax enough to get a very deep or restful sleep.

So I went searching for a better alarm clock especially for when I travel. This article in USA Today from Lisa A. Goldstein was helpful in my quest. In her article, Goldstein, who has a cochlear implant and a hearing aid herself, reviews several different types and brands of travel alarm clocks designed for people who are hard of hearing or Deaf.

These types of alarms work differently to help people with hearing loss: they can be extra-loud, or they can rely on vibrations, or they can use light. Some alarm models use a couple of these methods together. Many of these devices are portable enough to bring with you when you travel.

You can order these types of alarms in lots of places on the web, including Amazon, Diglo, HearWorld USA, and Walmart.

Do you have an alarm clock that works well for you and your hearing loss? Let us know in the comments.

Ending the isolation of hearing loss: Our Article in The Seattle Times

Imagine worrying about how you’ll communicate and hear everywhere you go. Now imagine automatic captions, hearing loops, and affordable hearing aids for everyone.

In our article in The Seattle Times, read about how together, we can end the isolation of hearing loss.

“We want to make communication access as ubiquitous as wheelchair ramps,” says HLAA-WA’s Perazzoli. “At the end of the day, we all want to be seen and heard.”

Imagine worrying about how you’ll communicate and hear everywhere you go. Now imagine automatic captions, hearing loops, and affordable hearing aids for everyone.

In our article in The Seattle Times, read about how together, we can end the isolation of hearing loss.

“We want to make communication access as ubiquitous as wheelchair ramps,” says HLAA-WA’s Perazzoli. “At the end of the day, we all want to be seen and heard.”

Simple System Helps People Hear at Counters and Desks

December 3, 2020 – Glass and plastic barriers–and ever-present face masks–may protect us from COVID19, but they make it harder, if not impossible, to hear one another. Sound is muffled and blocked, and we lose the ability to speech read.

Speech Transfer Systems, also called window intercoms, are a simple, affordable way to help people hear better. Microphones on each side, plus loop technology, isolate the speech we need to hear. People with hearing loss need this technology to communicate and to receive services, products, and care.

These systems provide so many benefits: ADA-mandated communication access, happy customers, confident employees, and better and faster client service and care.

Color photo of a Middle-aged man in glasses looking at the camera, raising one hand. A glass partition with the blue ear hearing accessibly logo in the corner is to the left.
Speech Transfer Systems, or window intercoms, can help people with hearing loss communicate better. Brown Audio Service shows you how.

Check out Brown Audio Service’s description of this simple technology, and watch their before-and-after demonstration video.