Hearing Aid Help, Our Picnic Next Weekend, and More News

Welcome to our July news! Our next newsletter arrives August 6, 2024.

Washington State Hearing Loss News

Our Annual Picnic Is Next Weekend!

You’re invited to our annual picnic at Lake Boren Park in Newcastle, Washington, on July 20, 2024, from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm. We’ll eat at noon.

A hearing loop and PA system are provided so we can hear one another better–thank you, Spencer Norby. We’ll have a FREE raffle with dozens of prizes coordinated by Sandy Bunning, barbecued hot dogs and sausages by grillmaster Rick Faunt, and more. We’ll provide coolers, ice, condiments like ketchup, chips, water, and coffee.

Everyone is welcome, including friends and family. Feel free to bring something to share, about 8 servings: If your last name is A-L, please feel free to bring a dessert or a side; M-Z folks, please feel free to bring a salad. Alcohol is not allowed in the park. Seating is limited, so you may want to bring a lawn chair, camp chair, or blanket.

Lake Boren Park is at 13058 SE 84th Way, in Newcastle, Washington, not far from Bellevue. We’ll be in the covered park area #2.

New Hearing Aids. What’s Next?

It can take a little time and effort to get used to new hearing aids. But it’s worth it.

Audiologist Ashima Verma offers some good advice on our blog this week, including on what to do if your own voice sounds too loud, where to find auditory training, and how music might help.

illustration of two people at a table with ears and musical notes and instruments surrounding them


Captions on Televisions in Public: It’s the Law

Televisions in public places are required to have captions turned on–always on. This is thanks to a law we helped pass in 2021.

Our blog post offers more details. You can also check out this helpful article from our friends at DeafFriendly Review. Please feel free to share our blog post and the links we included with restaurants, offices, bars, or anywhere you need captions on a television to enjoy a program, receive safety and other information, or simply relax and participate as others do.

photo of people cheering a sports event on a big-screen TV at a bar. the TV has the OC symbol for open captions


Volunteer Opportunity: Test a New Assistive Listening System in Olympia

Do you have some time to help us test a new assistive listening system at the ODHH offices in Olympia this Wednesday, July 10, from 10:00 am till noon?

The folks at ODHH have installed a Williams AV FM 558 Pro, which is said to be compatible with both Bluetooth and telecoil hearing aids and cochlear implants. The local Avidex AV team is conducting the training and testing in the Blake East Building in the Rose Conference Room.

If you can attend and perhaps help carpool, please let us know: cheri.perazzoli@loopwashington.org.

white meeting room with large window, white table, black chairs

National Hearing Loss News

Disability Pride Month: Checking Our Biases

The word “disability” doesn’t need to bring up negative feelings or connotations. In fact, by checking our biases and learning from others, we can help make the world a better place for people with disabilities of all kinds, including hearing loss.

We like this video from Blair Imani on disability pride, and this article from our friends at The Arc that talks about what else we can do to support Disability Pride. You can find a toolkit with ways to celebrate the Americans with Disabilities Act anniversary here.

color photo of black flag with diagonal rainbow. blue sky in background.

Huey Lewis Speaks Up About Hearing Loss

Remember the 80s pop star Huey Lewis? He’s been forthcoming about his hearing loss, and he has some interesting stories to tell. Here’s a cool interview with him from WNYC radio. We didn’t see a transcript for the audio interview, but let us know if you find one.

Photo credit: “All Star musician, Huey Lewis” by Rafael Amado Deras is licensed under CC BY 2.0.

rock star huey lewis, man with glasses holding a microphone

The Cure for Noisy Restaurants

Restaurants can be really frustrating when you have a hearing loss. Yet dining out with loved ones can create really lovely memories.

The Washington Posts discusses why restaurants are so maddeningly loud and what we can do. Why restaurants are so loud, and what science says we can do about it – Washington Post

Hat-tip to Carolyn Odio for this story.

color photo of three women sitting at an elegant restaurant drinking wine

Hearing Aids 101: Understanding the Complexities

Choosing a hearing aid isn’t a straightforward process. Here are some important things to know, such as why hearing aids aren’t like eyeglasses, the types and styles of hearing aids, and key features to consider.

color photo of a woman talking with another woman. they are looking at hearing aids

Treatment for Tinnitus Uses Your Tongue

You might have heard about a new, FDA-approved treatment that may help your tinnitus. The device, called Lenire, stimulates your tongue while generating sounds. The goal is to train your brain, in a sense, to pay less attention to the tinnitus.

Read more in this NPR article. If you’re interested, you can find a clinic that offers Lenire here.

If you’ve tried this new tinnitus treatment, please let us know how it works for you: webmaster@hearingloss-wa.org.

black and whit ephoto of a young woman covering her ears

Hearing Loops & Telecoils Spotlight

Pass-Through Spaces Need Loops, Too

Sometimes called “transient spaces,” these are the places you pass through briefly: information desks, ticket booths, and checkout counters. It can be really difficult to hear in those contexts, but an assistive listening system can improve customer service and communication, and help keep the line moving.

Hearing loops can help in these types of places. Read more from The Center for Hearing Access at The Shedd Institute.

color photo of three people smiling behind a counter. they'e holding signs with the blue ear symbol for hearing loop access

Hearing Loss Support Groups and Other Events

Hearing Access Awaiteth Thee at the
Oregon Shakespeare Festival

The Oregon Shakespeare Festival continues through the summer and into the fall with ASL planned performances, assistive listening devices, and closed caption tablets in several theaters.

You can currently get tickets for Macbeth, Virgins to Villains, Lizard Boy (an indie rock musical), Coriolanus, and many more.

Mariners Deaf & Hard-of-Hearing Night

The Seattle Mariners are in first place in their division. At least for now. Really!

So why not join them for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Night on September 28, 2024. Tickets are specially priced at $45 for the Main Level and $25 for View Level.

If you’d like to attend, please contact Ashima Verma, aashima.verma10@gmail.com. Ashima will coordinate our group attendance. If we have 20 or more fans in our group, we get free tickets and an announcement on the screen.

HLAA-Whatcom County Meeting
July 20, 2024

The award-winning HLAA-Whatcom County Chapter meets the third Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 am, at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church in Bellingham. At July’s meeting, the topic is “How We Have Fun!”

Virtual Hearing Loss Support Meeting
Find HOPE on August 7, 2024

Facilitated by a caring, compassionate HOPE Crew, these monthly virtual meetings are free, live-captioned, and open to everyone with hearing loss and to their friends and family. You’re welcome to ask questions, and also to simply relax, listen, and spend time with people who understand what it’s like to live with hearing loss.

Read the notes from the July HOPE meeting here. The group talked about healthcare access, restaurant TV caption, and more.

HOPE meets the first Wednesday of each month at 4:00 pm. We hope you can join us! 

text reads HOPE, virtual support group for living well with hearing loss, HOPE hearing other people's experiences

NO Renton Hearing Loss Support Group
Meeting in July or August

Our Renton support group meets the second Friday of each month (except July and August) at 1 pm at the Renton Senior Activity Center, 211 Burnett Avenue North, Renton. No need to register; simply check in at the front desk.

This group is led by our award-winning HLAA-WA Secretary Glenda Philio. A hearing loop is available, and everyone is welcome. Always free.

We’ll see you in September!

Seattle-Area ASL Social Events Offered

Seattle has an active community of people who use ASL. Several groups offer different events, and you’re sure to find one you like. Here’s a sampling:


black and white map of washington state with photos of people

Stay Involved with HLAA and HLAA-WA

We’re glad you’re part of our community.

What more can you do to support people with hearing loss?

HLAA-WA does not endorse any technology, nor does exclusion suggest disapproval. We support the full spectrum of hearing technologies for everyone. As an all-volunteer run organization, 100% of every dollar donated is directed to our programs. HLAA-WA is an IRS non-profit 501(c)(3) organization; all donations are tax-deductible as allowed by relevant IRS code.


Related Posts

Awards and Scholarship Winners, Access, BAHA Hearing Aids, and More News

Welcome to our June news! Our next newsletter arrives July 9, 2024. Until then, we’ll see you in Phoenix at the HLAA convention!

Washington State Hearing Loss News

What’s a BAHA Hearing Aid, Anyway?

In this three-part blog series, “The Things We Do When We Have a Hearing Loss,” Rick Faunt writes with humor and wisdom about his hearing loss journey. In the third and final post, he discusses his surgery and recovery, and why a BAHA was a good solution for his hearing loss.

color photo of side of head, baha hearing aid, and ear


Local Hearing Loss Advocates Receive National Awards

Four Washington State advocates will receive national HLAA awards this month at the HLAA convention in Phoenix.

Find out who in this blog post.

We’re beaming with pride and gratitude.

3-photo montage, two smiling women and one woman with hear arms around two grade-school children in front of the state capitol. text reads 2024 national hlaa award winners


We’re Looking for a New Treasurer. Is It You?

Our longtime treasurer and board member Rick Faunt is stepping down this year. That means you have an opportunity to join our board.

Read more about what’s involved with the role and find out how to apply on our website.

hand drawing red line under the words join us

Reminder: Our Annual Picnic Is July 20

We’re returning once again to Lake Boren Park for our picnic on July 20, 2024, in Newcastle, Washington. Everyone is welcome. A hearing loop and PA system are provided. We’ll have a raffle and perhaps some open mic and sharing.

Stay tuned for more details.

white illustrated outline of a picnic basket on purple background. text reads annual hlaa-wa picnic, everyone is welcome, join us for a hearing-friendly summer picnic, july 20, 2024, lake boren park, newcastle, wa

You Want to Talk to My Caregiver?
Stories from Life with Hearing Loss

In a recent trip to a “Buy-A-Lot-Co” store, hearing loss advocate Greg Bawden encountered a strange reaction from a staff member when he pointed out that staff needed training in communicating with hard-of-hearing folks.

Greg describes what happened and what he did next in an article on his LinkedIn page.

photo of a shopping cart looking down the aisle of a costco-type store

Whatcom County Chapter Announces 2024
Scholarship Winners

Congratulations to Jace Stanley and Jesse Stewart winners of HLAA-Whatcom County’s Founders Fund scholarships. Both Jace and Jesse attend Lynden High School, and each is now eligible to receive $500 a year for up to 4 years of post-secondary education.

color stock photo of a jar of coins, plus a small graduation cap

News from the Washington State Association of the Deaf: Emergency Planning, Community Art, and More

  • Community Meeting with the Everett Police Department – Learn about how the Everett police plan to better serve the Deaf and hard-of-hearing communities on Saturday, June 22, 2024, at 2:00 pm at the Everett Police office, 1121 SE Everett Mall Way. Captions and ASL provided.
  • The Coalition on Inclusive Emergency Planning is working on distribution of ASL emergency alerts, interpreter availability, and ASL classes for the Emergency Management Division.
  • Deaf Spotlight is showcasing a community art exhibit, “Summer Solstice,” June 1 – 30th, 2024. The exhibit also features a reception on June 22, 2024.
color photo of a man with glasses in a light green shirt using ASL to communicate with a kindergarten-aged boy in glasses and a dark green shirt


Local Classes Aim to Help You Prevent Falls

Hearing loss is linked to an increased risk of falling. Beyond getting hearing aids, what else can you do to reduce the risk of a tumble?

Several different types of falls prevention classes are available not only in King County, but across the state. Project Enhance Fitness, Stay Active and Independent for Life (SAIL), Otago, and a Matter of Balance (MOB) classes are available, and in long-term care facilities, a program called STEADI is being tested.

For more information, check out your local senior and community centers. You can also check these resources for more classes, home safety checklists, videos, and more about preventing falls.

color photo of man with silver hair and a light blue shirt taking an exercise class. he's holding a pole above his head and smiling. other exercises are in the background

National Hearing Loss News

Telehealth Accessibility Is Long Overdue

Telehealth can be a huge help in getting care, especially if you have a disability, live in a rural area, or have barriers to getting to a doctor’s office.

One barrier that needs to be addressed to ensure equal access: telehealth accessibility. Telehealth captions are needed for millions of people who have a hearing loss.

More in this article in STAT News.

color photo of woman in blue scrubs and a long dark ponytail. she's looking at a laptop

Deaf Filmmaker Tells Stories in a Different Way

This story caught our attention. Deaf filmmaker Alison O’Daniel is the director of Tuba Thieves, a film that takes a very different approach to filmmaking.

“The goal was to make the viewer feel the film physically, and be very active. And also to recreate a visual version of the feeling I have with my hearing: a lack of clarity or ownership over the image,” she says in this PBS article.

Tuba Thieves has shown on the film festival circuit, including at Sundance, but you can also watch it on the PBS Independent Lens website.

color photo of woman in large glasses and orange shirt. bright blue background

Airport Hearing Accessibility Improvements Arriving Soon

Few places can be more frustrating than airports, especially if you’re trying to hear announcements, talk to a gate agent, or find your way around.

Good news: Flying while you have a hearing loss is about to get easier.

photo of woman from behind. she's wearing a backpack and gazing up at a digital airport arrivals board

Hearing Loops & Telecoils Spotlight

How Do I Pay for a Hearing Loop?

Hearing loop advocates often get the question, “But how do I pay for the loop?” There are lots of ways, including direct fundraising from parishioners, patrons, and the community.

But there are lots of other ways. Here’s a list of ways to help fund hearing loops at different types of venues.

split screen. left side is a stack of coins with a tiny green plant. right side is the purple universal symbol for hearing loop access

Airport Loops Await You in Phoenix, Memphis

If you’re headed to the HLAA convention in Phoenix this month, be sure to use the hearing loops at the Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport. Thank you to the wonderful hearing loss advocates in Arizona (Michele Michaels!) who made that happen.

If you trip takes you through Memphis, we’ve learned that there are loops throughout the Memphis airport, too. Ditto for the Albuquerque and Grand Rapids airports.

We encourage you to turn your hearing aid to T or telecoil mode and tune into the airport loops to make your trip easier and more comfortable.

a photo taken from the back of a man with red hair and a buttondown shirt. he's holding a suitcase and gazing out toward the tarmac of an airport.

Hearing Loss Events

Renton Hearing Loss Support Group
Friday, June 14, 2024

Our Renton support group meets the second Friday of each month (except July and August) at 1 pm at the Renton Senior Activity Center, 211 Burnett Avenue North, Renton. No need to register; simply check in at the front desk.

This group is led by our award-winning HLAA-WA Secretary Glenda Philio. A hearing loop is available, and everyone is welcome. Always free.

white text on purple background reads hearing loss help, renton support group, june 14, 2024, renton senior activity center

HLAA-Whatcom County Meeting
Saturday, June 15, 2024

The award-winning HLAA-Whatcom County Chapter meets the third Saturday of every month at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church, 2600 Lakeway Drive, Bellingham, Washington. Social time starts at 9:30 am and the meeting runs from 10:00 – 11:30 am. Live CART and a hearing loop provided. Everyone is welcome.

For more information on in-person hearing loss support, visit our website.

white text on purple background reads hearing loss help, whatcom county, june 15, 2024, 9:30, christ the servant lutheran church, bellingham

Virtual Hearing Loss Support Meeting
Find HOPE on July 3, 2024

Facilitated by a caring, compassionate HOPE Crew, these monthly virtual meetings are free, live-captioned, and open to everyone with hearing loss and to their friends and family. You’re welcome to ask questions, and also to simply relax, listen, and spend time with people who understand what it’s like to live with hearing loss.

Read the notes from the June HOPE meeting here. The group talked about healthcare access, restaurant TV caption, and more.

HOPE meets the first Wednesday of each month at 4:00 pm. We hope you can join us! 

text reads HOPE, virtual support group for living well with hearing loss, HOPE hearing other people's experiences

Learn About ODHH’s Case Management Services at Meetings Across the State

Understand your rights, find out how case managers can help you, and discover new resources and services at three community meetings coming up in June with the Washington State Office of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (ODHH).

  • Tuesday, June 11, 10 – 11 am, Bellingham DSHS, 2219 Rimland Drive, Suite 419, Bellingham
  • Tuesday, June 11, 2 – 3 pm, Seattle DSHS, 1700 East Cherry Street, Suite 200, Seattle.
  • Wednesday, June 12, 10 – 11 am, Tacoma DSHS Centennial Building, 1949 S State Street, Tacoma.

Captioning and ASL provided. Free.

log of the washington state department of social & health services ODHH office of the deaf and hard of hearing

Last Chance to Register for the HLAA Convention

Celebrate with friends old and new at the Welcome Back Bash and the Awards Ceremony, learn about new technologies, and soak up some Arizona sunshine at the 2024 HLAA convention, June 26-29, 2024 at the Sheraton Grand at Wild Horse in Phoenix.

We’ll be there. Will you?

color photo of two women at a trade show looking at a hearing aid

Happy Pride Month

At HLAA-WA, we wish our friends and members in the LGBTQ+ community a very Happy Pride Month in June.

hand with long red fingernails holding a rainbow heart

Stay Involved with HLAA and HLAA-WA

We’re glad you’re part of our community.

What more can you do to support people with hearing loss?

black and white map of washington state with photos of people

HLAA-WA does not endorse any technology, nor does exclusion suggest disapproval. We support the full spectrum of hearing technologies for everyone. As an all-volunteer run organization, 100% of every dollar donated is directed to our programs. HLAA-WA is an IRS non-profit 501(c)(3) organization; all donations are tax-deductible as allowed by relevant IRS code.


Related Posts

The Things We Do When We Have a Hearing Loss:
The Final Chapter (I Hope), or How I Got My BAHA

By Rick Faunt

You might have read part one and part two of my story, where I chronicled my attempts to improve the hearing on my right side. The short version of why I have that hearing loss: I have a non-functioning Eustachian tube, and the bones in the middle ear have rotted away from too many infections. I had seven surgeries to clean the area, insert tubes, and place (and replace and replace, etc.) the prosthesis.

Finally, the doctors and I gave up on that approach and decided on a new type of hearing aid. The goal here this time was to remove the hearing aid from the ear canal and allow the ear to drain and dry itself.

An example of a BAHA.
Photo credit:
Oticon Medical.

What’s a BAHA?

The Bone Anchored Hearing Aid, or BAHA, had been used in Europe for a while and had made its debut in good old U.S. of A. Back then, I was the third patient at the VA to receive a BAHA, but in the 20 years or so since, the BAHA has become more prevalent. Basically, it uses bone conduction to transfer the sound to the inner ear. A titanium post is inserted into the mastoid bone above the outer ear and the processor snaps onto the post. The processor vibrates, these vibrations are carried through the bone to the inner ear, and the sound is processed normally.

The BAHA comes in several styles and colors. The style will depend upon your hearing loss. Generally, the BAHA is indicated for mild to moderate conductive hearing loss; however, it is also effective for single-sided deafness. BAHA accessories are available: directional microphones, audio adapters, and others. Cochlear decided that t-coils are not needed in BAHAS now and replaced them with Bluetooth. I have mixed emotions about that.

Ah-Ha! Hearing Better with a BAHA

But I am very pleased and excited with my BAHA. I am hearing better than I have in years. The first night I had the processor, I was in a meeting in a hotel room with five other veterans, and I was able to hear and follow several conversations well enough to make appropriate responses and not just make up answers. Veterans, at least the ones I hang out with, are a loud and boisterous group, so being able to do this was fantastic. I got several comments that night about how responsive I was and how people hadn’t seen me smile so much in years. That is the good side! The aid works very well for me.

The downside is that with the t-coil now being an accessory, I have to remember where the adapter is and take time to let everything connect via Bluetooth. That means another device hanging from my neck, and if the phone rings, I have to reconnect the Bluetooth with the phone, so I miss some calls.

The BAHA Surgery

Now I’ll describe the fun part: the procedure. Getting a BAHA involves some relatively simple surgery. The level of anesthesia depends upon the doctor and patient tolerance. I was originally told I would have a general anesthetic, but the anesthesiologist decided I was young and robust enough to tolerate a local. I was given what she called the “happy drug.”

First, around the area where the implant is going to be, they fold back a flap of skin and scrape off the hair follicles to prevent hair from growing back around the abutment (the titanium stud). I am guessing, but I think the size of the area was about a half dollar size; it ends up with a quarter-sized area that is bald. Then a hole is drilled, tapped, and the stud is screwed in. Since I was mostly awake and drifting in and out of “never-never land,” it was somewhat disconcerting to hear the doctor ask for a high-speed drill, then a torque wrench, and then finally — the fun part — I heard, “Not deep enough, back the stud out.”

More drilling was heard and felt through the mastoid, and then the doctor again asked for the torque wrench. This time he seemed to be satisfied, and he continued his joking with the resident doctors.

An Easy BAHA Recovery

I found out later that I was the third person to receive a BAHA at the VA Hospital, so I was, once again, that guinea pig that I complained about in earlier articles. This time, though, I didn’t mind; everyone had a goal and knew what the result should be.

The whole procedure took about an hour and a half. The only complication, which resulted in nausea, was a reaction to being given too much codeine on an empty stomach. Unlike previous surgeries on my ear, I was able to take normal showers and had no lifestyle restrictions.

In the days following the implant, I can’t tell you if I had pain or not because I used the “happy pills” they gave me. But I don’t recall having any of the problems that I thought I might have. Although, if the wind is cold and the stud uncovered, it creates one heck of a chill!

After the abutment is implanted, it takes about three months before the processor is attached. The delay is to give the bone a chance to grow around the implant and make a solid contact for conducting the vibrations.

BAHA for the Win: Near-Normal Hearing

At this point, other than the relatively minor factors I’ve discussed, I am finding the BAHA to be an exceptional hearing device, and I am very pleased with the results. In fact, the day I got my processor, the audiologist gave me a quick hearing exam and stated that, on that side, I had near-normal hearing. Also, since one goal of getting the BAHA was to clear the ear canal, I have not noticed a recurrence of the chronic ear infections, and I have discontinued use of the antibiotic.

It is certainly worth discussing with your hearing care specialist to determine if a BAHA would meet your needs.

About the author

Rick Faunt has been a member of HLAA, in its several names, since 1996. He has held nearly every office at the Chapter and State level and continues to this day. He is a retired Boeing worker and was a consultant/installer of various Assistive Listening Systems for the hard of hearing.

The Things We Do When We Have a Hearing Loss
Part Two

By Rick Faunt, HLAA-WA Treasurer

photo of headphones, ear probe, and an audiology exam report

I left off in Part 1 of my story with the hope that a half-dozen surgical attempts to correct a hearing loss would result in stabilized hearing. You may remember that my hearing loss was caused by a nonfunctioning Eustachian tube that allowed a bumper crop of germs, bugs, and other slimy things to grow and feed upon the middle ear bones. Unfortunately, my usual luck continued to hold true after these surgeries.

Success…Kind of

Yes, the surgeries did work. I got a 20 dB improvement in the hearing on my right side that lasted almost a year. But — and there’s always a “but,” isn’t there? — the “permanent” ventilation tube that was supposed to allow the ear to drain and keep the pressure equal got plugged, and it needed some TLC from the doctor.

I didn’t really notice the decrease in hearing until I had my annual follow-up hearing test and exam by the staff at the Veterans Affairs Regional Medical Center. The audiologist noticed that my hearing level had dropped since the post-surgery test, and I had effectively lost about half of the gain we had made. He also noted that the eardrum had a poor response to the pressure test.

After giving me that batch of good news, he sent me out to the waiting room to think about things until the ENT doctor could see me. The luck of the draw gave me the resident doctor this time instead of the head doctor. Oh goody, more practice for a resident! I am convinced that my chart is stamped with big letters saying, “This guy is a great guinea pig.”

Sharp, Pointed Objects….Ooops

The resident doctor looked in my ear and determined that the tube was plugged up. He tried to unstop it using a variety of sharp, pointed objects. When these didn’t work, he tried the suction hose. That worked, I guess. It sucked out the tube along with whatever was clogging it.

Upon hearing him say “Oops!” I became decidedly unfriendly. After exchanging thoughts and plans of action, we decided to let the ear heal, and I’d come back in a few months to see if any fluid had built up. He decided this after I explained in my calm, quiet, reasonable manner that the reason the tube was in my ear in the first place is because I have a long history of fluid building up and causing problems.

I waited the three months it takes for things to heal, or maybe they felt it takes that long for me to calm down. When I returned, this time I got the man, the head honcho himself, the guy that did the surgery. He looked in my ear and concluded that I needed a tube inserted to drain the fluid that had built up. Maybe the look of absolute disgust on my face had something to do with it, or maybe he suddenly recalled some of my discussions with his staff. Either way, he then apologized and said that getting a new tube inserted would probably become a routine part of my hearing care plan.

So, the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Stay tuned for part three.

About the author

Rick Faunt has been a member of HLAA, in its several names, since 1996. He has held nearly every office at the Chapter and State level and continues to this day. He is a retired Boeing worker and was a consultant/installer of various Assistive Listening Systems for the hard of hearing.